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1986 FZ 600
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I had a quick look here and couldn't find it in print. I do know that 14mm is a common height and I would beleive that to be right if no other confirmation is found.

Carlsalter.com had this supplimentary service manual. It doesn't list the float height but does have the correct OEM jet sizes. Being a 20 year old bike you may want to confirm the jet sizes for piece of mind.

There was a 1998 service manual but I don't know if the 2002 ran the same carbs. If you know other bikes that ran that carb and had the same cylinder angle you can use the same float height.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had a quick look here and couldn't find it in print. I do know that 14mm is a common height and I would beleive that to be right if no other confirmation is found.

Carlsalter.com had this supplimentary service manual. It doesn't list the float height but does have the correct OEM jet sizes. Being a 20 year old bike you may want to confirm the jet sizes for piece of mind.

There was a 1998 service manual but I don't know if the 2002 ran the same carbs. If you know other bikes that ran that carb and had the same cylinder angle you can use the same float height.

In the manual it is described to be measured in a different way, attaching the picture. It's a little bit confusing for me.

I just wanted to see if someone has done it before and knows the float height measurement of the carburetors while i still have them opened.

Font Parallel Drawing Pattern Paper
 

· Super Moderator
1986 FZ 600
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90 Posts
I have never done it as the manual shows. Like you, I typically like to set my height from the mating suface to the top of the float. I have seen people use clear tubing to check float heights visually and diagnose problems but it is a very awkward way to make precise measurements. In this case I would do 14mm and then check the height with tubing as the manual says.

I would be inclined to use some clear aquarium air line tubing and I would make two lines on it 4.5mm apart about8 inches from the end. Once you open the fuel screw, line the bottom mark up with the mating surface and the fuel should fill to the upper line. That will be way easier than trying to get calipers or a ruler in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have never done it as the manual shows. Like you, I typically like to set my height from the mating suface to the top of the float. I have seen people use clear tubing to check float heights visually and diagnose problems but it is a very awkward way to make precise measurements. In this case I would do 14mm and then check the height with tubing as the manual says.

I would be inclined to use some clear aquarium air line tubing and I would make two lines on it 4.5mm apart about8 inches from the end. Once you open the fuel screw, line the bottom mark up with the mating surface and the fuel should fill to the upper line. That will be way easier than trying to get calipers or a ruler in there.
After opening carburators the only residuew was underneat the rubber diaphragm. What could be the cuase of that ?
Everything else was in perfect condition only had to adjust the pilot screw by half a turn and place new o rings. The floats turned out to be 14.4mm when i opened them and i think not to adjust them since there were no leaks ?
Automotive tire Bumper Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Font
 

· Super Moderator
1986 FZ 600
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90 Posts
I would adjust the floats. The carb is actually upside down when you are measuring so the floats being higher than spec means your fuel level is lower than spec.

Fuel level higher than spec can cause fuel to come out over flows. A low fuel level can cause bogging due to starvation when accelerating or under heavy load.

I am not sure about the gunk. I would clean it up and reassemble. It doesn’t appear the gaskets leaked. Likely fuel residue from the chamber below.
 
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